Could party drug ‘Special-K’ be miracle cure for clinical depression?

Internist Dr. John Sortino said a few years ago a good friend’s mother died and he watched his pal fall into a deep clinical depression.

He would invite him to his Boca Raton practice to keep an eye him, watching as he sobbed for eight hours straight.

“I’ve never seen a grown man cry that long,” Sortino said.

The $11 billion anti-depressant industry didn’t help Sortino’s friend. He just got worse taking pills before reading about how the anesthesia-turned-party drug ketamine had shown promise as an off-label medication for severe depression.

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Could the party drug ketamine be the miracle cure for those suffering from clinical depression?

After some hesitation, Sortino ordered the shot and administered it to his friend. His friend’s suicide ideation immediately ceased.

Now Sortino is bringing this alternate cure to South Florida. He says his new depression center, Kismet Clinic in Boca Raton, was the first to offer the treatment in Palm Beach County and is one of two establishments offering ketamine  currently.

Typical drugs for depression take months to work.

“The discovery of ketamine’s ability to effectively treat depression represents the most significant leap in mental health advancements in more than 50 years,” Dr. Sortino states.

Ketamine was used for medical and veterinarian surgery to put patients to sleep before surgery. Then the club scene got a hold of it, dubbed it Special-K. Users would enter a hallucinogenic  “K-Hole” similar to a catatonic state.

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